Jasmine

Jasmine flower

As I take a little walk around the block, the drifting scent of jasmine coming from other gardens in my neighbourhood permeates the moment, and I enjoy this uplifting floral aroma as part of my mindfulness activity. The arrival of jasmine’s scent in the air reminds we are in the middle of Spring.

Oil of the Month

Today I discuss jasmine as Titch Haven’s ‘oil of the month’; however, the scent of jasmine that is used in aromatherapy is technically not an essential oil. The aromatics of jasmine blossoms cannot be effectively steam distilled from the petals and so applying the usual essential oil extraction technique will not work. Instead, a solvent extraction process is used, creating a highly concentrated ‘absolute’. Therefore, we refer to jasmine extract as ‘jasmine absolute’ and it is not a true essential oil. Regardless, jasmine absolute has a wonderful aroma that is important in both aromatherapy and the perfumery industry and can be used in a similar way to essential oils.

Jasmine’s botanical title is Jasminum grandiflorum, a name no doubt chosen as it belongs in the royalty of floral plants. The jasmine grown for its aromatics comes from Egypt, France, Italy, and, of course, India. Jasmine absolute is very expensive because the flowers are harvested by hand at night to maximise the yield of aromatics from the blossom, plus much petal material is needed. Thankfully, a small amount of the absolute goes a long way and it is a long-lasting aroma. This intense scent is floral, warm, musky and exotic. The chemistry of the absolute is fascinatingly complex and explains the depth and richness of the aroma.

Jasmine combines beautifully with other floral essential oils and absolutes (such as geranium and rose), making for divinely feminine blends. Add jasmine to herbaceous oils to soften the nature of a blend. For an uplifting blend, mix jasmine with citrus oils such as bergamot or mandarin.

Jasmine – Sacred Oil

Jasmine is long held as a sacred ‘oil’, and not just because of the expense of it! This aroma is exalted for spiritual enlightenment. Using jasmine during meditation or yoga will enhance these practices. Combine jasmine with sandalwood and lemon and let the inspirational aroma guide you on a journey of self-discovery, exploring one’s highest self.

Jasmine is also a known aphrodisiac. The exotic aroma  will heightening one’s own sexuality. It promotes connectedness with a partner, as well. Invite jasmine to your evening for a blissful experience.

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Author: Rebecca Tichbon

Rebecca Tichbon originally qualified as a Medical Scientist and then she fell into a health and science teaching career higher education Beck now runs two successful wellness businesses in Bunbury, Western Australia, and is about to publish her first book. To get to where she is now, Beck has been through many trials and tragedies; she shares her story in her book. Beck is passionate about women’s wellbeing and finds fulfilment in supporting others on their own wellness journeys through her all of her work.

You can find out more about Rebecca Tichbon here: https://www.titchhaven.com.au